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AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX and 2920X
Date 30th October 2018
Author booj
Editor James "Agg" Rolfe
Manufacturer AMD


AMD RYZEN THREADRIPPER 2970WX AND 2920X REVIEW: ROUNDING OUT THE THREADRIPPER RANGE

Click to Enlarge

For the best part of a decade, AMD was simply a non-factor in the high end desktop market. That all changed with the release of the first generation Threadripper processors in mid-2017, topped by the 16-core 1950X. Desktop users now had access to CPUs with core counts that were previously restricted to the much more expensive enterprise realm. The CPU package with its 4-die design, only 2 of which were active, left open the possibility that weíd eventually get a full 32-core option, and indeed thatís what we got with the release of the 2990WX a couple of months ago.

A single CPU with 32 cores brought unprecedented levels of multi-threaded power to the consumer desktop, and it didnít even require a motherboard change. So powerful is the 2990WX that many tasks simply canít make use of all the horsepower on tap. However apps designed with the appropriate threading simply fly. Thirty-two cores isnít for everyone though, and thus the 2990WX was released alongside the 2950X. This CPU proved to be a good all-rounder thanks to its still-impressive 16-core count and relatively high turbo boost frequencies.

Click to Enlarge

Fast forward to today and we have the final two second-generation Threadripper models making their debut. The 2970WX is a 24 core/48 thread CPU aimed at content creators who donít require the all-out power of the earlier 32-core flagship. Itís joined by the 2920X, which on paper is a very interesting CPU indeed. Itís a 12-core/24-thread CPU that still has plenty of multithreaded grunt on hand, but is more accommodating for 2018 consumer level software and Windows scheduling. It can boost up to 4.3GHz, meaning it should be a capable gaming CPU yet still has the core count to outperform every mainstream desktop CPU in applications that can make use of serious multi-threading.


Hereís a look at the second generation Threadripper line-up. All of the new models have boost clocks well above 4.0 GHz, bringing them into line with the other 12nm Ryzen CPUs. The TDP is increased for the WX models over the first generation, which is no surprise given the increased core counts.

Click to Enlarge
Source: AMD

The large retail packaging contains the processor inside its own inner case, an installation guide, a BIOS update reminder and sticker. Thereís a screwdriver that fits the threaded screws holding the CPU retention mechanism in place. Finally thereís a bracket for some Asetek all in one coolers that add support for the TR4 socket.

Click to Enlarge
Source: AMD


Read on, as we look at the CPU features in detail.

Page 1: Introduction and Packaging
Page 2: Features, X399 Chipset, Ryzen Master
Page 3: Benchmarking Setup and Results
Page 4: Temperatures, Power, Conclusions


All original content copyright James Rolfe.
All rights reserved. No reproduction allowed without written permission.
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