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Thursday Morning (4 Comments) (link)
 Thursday, 25-August-2016  00:26:59 (GMT +10) - by Agg

Anandtech have posted part two of their AMD Zen microarchitecture exploration. Hot Chips is an annual conference that allows semiconductor companies to present their latest and greatest ideas or forthcoming products in an academic-style environment, and is predominantly aimed as the professional semiconductor engineer. This year has a number of talks about power management, upcoming IBM CPUs, upcoming Intel CPUs, upcoming NVIDIA SoCs and the final talk of the final day is from AMD, discussing Zen in even more depth than the previous week.

They also have a die shot of NVIDIA's Pascal GP100. Over the next two days we’ll be covering the highlights of several presentations, but I wanted to start this year’s coverage off with some nerdy pictures. I am of course referring to die shots, as NVIDIA has released the first die shot of their behemoth 610mm2 GP100 die as part of a presentation on Pascal and NVLink 1.0. Die shots have been relatively rare in the GPU industry in recent years, particularly those for the highest-end GPUs with the most features.

Engadget meanwhile report on a new NVIDIA CPU made for autonomous cars. However, Parker is significantly less beefy than NVIDIA's other deep learning initiative, the DGX-1 for Elon Musk's OpenAI, which can hit 170 teraflops of performance. This platform still sounds more than capable of running high-end digital dashboards and keeping your future autonomous car shiny side up without a problem, regardless.

Not to be left out, Samsung apparently have a neural network deep in the brain of their Galaxy S7. One thing that caught our eye was a mention that the branch predictor uses a neural network to take a good guess at the twists and turns the software will take through its code. If your CPU can predict accurately which instructions an app is going to execute next, you can continue priming the processing pipeline with instructions rather than dumping the pipeline every time you hit a jump. "The neural net gives us very good prediction rates," said Brad Burgess, who is Samsung's chief CPU architect and is based at the South Korean giant's R&D center in Austin, Texas.

Chromebooks have outsold Macs in the USA for the first quarter ever. More Google Chromebooks are sold in the US than Apple Macs, according to the latest figures from analyst firm IDC. While few think of the company, famous more for its mobile and internet software, as a major creator of PC operating systems, the slimmed-down Chrome OS has powered almost 2m laptops sold to Americans in the first quarter of 2016, IDC told the Verge. By comparison, Apple sold 1.76m Macs in the same period.

Today marks the 25th Anniversary of Linux. The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced the immediate release of its 2016 report “Linux Kernel Development - How Fast It is Going, Who is Doing It, What They are Doing, and Who is Sponsoring It”. The report comes just days before the 25th anniversary of the initial release of the Linux kernel by Linus Torvalds on August 25, 1991, and analyzes the work done by over 13,500 developers over more than a decade, as well as more recent trends.



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All original content copyright James Rolfe. All rights reserved. No reproduction allowed without written permission.