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OCAU News
Wednesday Morning (0 Comments) (link)
 Wednesday, 5-October-2016  10:52:47 (GMT +10) - by Agg

Melbourne is on track to have the largest free public Wi-Fi network in Australia. The first access points have been activated at all train stations within the Melbourne CBD, and at Bourke Street Mall, Queen Victoria Market, and South Wharf Promenade at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre. All access points for VicFreeWiFi, which was labelled "unparalleled" by the state government, will be activated as of the end of the year. Once it is fully operational, the wireless network will provide coverage to an area of 600,000 square metres, making it the largest free public Wi-Fi network in the country.

Soon the UN will take over the running of the internet. The US government is set to cut the final thread of its oversight of the internet, yielding a largely symbolic but nevertheless significant role over the online address system. Barring any last-minute glitches, the transition will occur at midnight Friday (0400 GMT Saturday), when the US contract expires for the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, which manages the internet's so-called "root zone."

Fans of William Gibson novels might get a kick out of this project to build a cyberdeck. It was one of the first novels in the genre that came to be called “cyberpunk”, and it described a gritty future full of cybernetics, mega corporations, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality. The protagonist of this tale was a hacker named Case who used a portable computer called a “cyberdeck” to connect his brain directly to the internet and experience it as virtual reality.

Tired sent in this alarming tale of a computer argument gone wrong in Sydney. Liverpool Police Detective Chief Inspector Ken Hardie said police would allege the argument was about a computer at the house, which the family had disagreements about in the past. "I believe the son uses the internet quite regularly and when he is asked to come to the dinner table he continues on," Detective Chief Inspector Hardie.

Professional space nerd Neil Degrasse Tyson is building a computer game, thanks zero_velocity. Murphy said the gameplay mirrors our universe, which is growing every day, inch by inch, minute by minute. The game allows players to build and grow solar systems – even galaxies. Players can also explore galaxies created by other players, including prominent scientists and fictional world-builders like Tyson, Bill Nye, George R.R. Martin, Neil Gaiman, and Peter Beagle.

On a related note, Wired have an interview with "The Martian" author Andy Weir about Elon Musk's plans for Mars. o who better to discuss the differences between science and science fiction than an actual science fiction author—one who studied up for years on the problems of surviving on Mars before crafting a cracking good story about how exactly it might work? And as it happens, we know the perfect such person: author Andy Weir, whose best-selling novel The Martian (and the subsequent Ridley Scott movie) covers much of the same ground Musk wants to cover—though Musk is dreaming on a much larger scale.



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All original content copyright James Rolfe. All rights reserved. No reproduction allowed without written permission.