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Monday Night (4 Comments) (link)
 Monday, 6-August-2018  22:19:53 (GMT +10) - by Agg

The Australian Computer Museum Society are still looking for people to save their collection of vintage computers, thanks David. Some of the Australian Computer Museum Society’s 50,000-item-strong collection may be bulldozed next week, because the warehouse it occupies is scheduled for demolition and the Museum can’t find alternative accommodation within its budget. The Society currently occupies a warehouse in the Sydney suburb of Villawood. Curator John Geremin said the Museum’s collection occupied more than 200 square meters on triple-level racks. Among the notable items in the collection are an EAI analog computer from the 1940s, vintage minicomputers from the 1960s and 1970s, and what Geremin described as “disk drives that are bigger than your washing machine”. I think this week is crunch time - discussion continues in this thread.

ExtremeTech meanwhile ponder some of the worst CPUs ever made. To make it on to this list, a CPU needed to be fundamentally broken, as opposed to simply being poorly positioned or slower than expected. The annals of history are already stuffed with mediocre products that didn’t quite meet expectations but weren’t truly bad.

The best news I've heard in a while is that Jean-Luc Picard is back! Or will be soon, anyway. It’s official — Patrick Stewart is returning to the Star Trek franchise. The acclaimed Shakespearean actor is set to headline a new Star Trek series for CBS All Access, reprising his iconic Next Generation character, Captain Jean-Luc Picard. The project, which has been rumored since the June announcement of a Star Trek universe expansion with new series, was just unveiled by Stewart himself in a surprise appearance at the Las Vegas Star Trek Convention.

TSMC recently had a virus infection which has somewhat derailed production and will affect its bottom line. Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) has disclosed that a computer virus stalling part of its production over the weekend is expected to impact 3% of its third-quarter 2018 revenues. "TSMC expects this incident to cause shipment delays and additional costs," said the world's top foundry service provider in an update today about the impact of virus infection that it first reported on Saturday.

Just when you thought HDDs were dead, Seagate have a new multi-actuator system to speed them up. Today Seagate said its new MACH.2™ Multi Actuator technology has enabled them to set a new hard drive speed record, demonstrating up to 480MB/s sustained throughput — the fastest ever. Seagate formally introduced its MACH.2 Multi Actuator technology yesterday, which has now been deployed in development units for customer testing prior to productization.

Popular anti-bloatware tool CCleaner has some privacy issues of its own, thanks Axe. Piriform, the original developer behind CCleaner, was acquired by antivirus outfit Avast not long ago. Shortly afterwards, malware found its way into a public build of the program. You'd think, given this catastrophe, Avast would be a bit more careful with its updates. Apparently not. Bowing to online pressure, the company has pulled the latest version of CCleaner, 5.45, after it was discovered the ability to opt-out of program's data gathering was removed.

TechPowerUp used the game Yakuza 0 to compare video card performance. Yakuza 0 finally lets PC gamers in on the Japanese mafia action that console gamers have enjoyed for years. The game has an entertaining storyline that will make you laugh, and shudder at the subtleties of Japanese nightlife. We test the game on 15 graphics cards, take a look at VRAM usage and check CPU core scaling.



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All original content copyright James Rolfe. All rights reserved. No reproduction allowed without written permission.