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OCAU News
Monday Morning (6 Comments) (link)
 Monday, 26-September-2011  01:34:29 (GMT +10) - by Agg

Google+ is now open to everyone and has some new features. After nearly 90 days in field trial mode, Google is opening its social network up to everyone, and has made a total of 100 updates to enhance the experience. I've had an account on it for a while, but due to some Google Account awkwardness and general lack of time, I haven't really used it much. If you're a Google+ convert, tell me in the comments what's so great about it. :)

An online poker site with some Australian links has collapsed, leaving people without their winnings. In a June 2009 lawsuit, Full Tilt alleged Tzvetkoff had stolen more than $42 million while conducting transactions for the site. A month later, Tzvetkoff's Brisbane-based company BT Projects collapsed, owing about $180 million and he was arrested months later while visiting Las Vegas. The US Attorney's office alleges that by March 31 this year, Full Tilt owed about $390 million to players around the world but had only $60 million in its bank accounts.

Stygian spotted that VPNs are not a magic anonymity solution, unfortunately enough for one alleged LulzSec member. The blog post, titled “Lulzsec fiasco” also added the following: “Our VPN service and VPN services in general are not designed to be used to commit illegal activity. It is very naive to think that by paying a subscription fee to a VPN service you are free to break the law without any consequences. This includes certain hardcore privacy services which claim you will never be identified, these types of services that do not cooperate are more likely to have their entire VPN network monitored and tapped by law enforcement, thus affecting all legitimate customers.”

Rick Bergman has left AMD. Bergman joined AMD from ATI after the 2006 merger. Following a tenure as Senior VP of AMD's Graphics Product Group, Bergman became the head of the Products Group when AMD combined its graphics and microprocessor businesses in May 2009.

Meanwhile HP have named their new CEO, but people don't seem too impressed. "While we believe the decision to replace Leo Apotheker was a good one, we are disappointed with the naming of Meg Whitman as HP's permanent CEO, and believe that this sentiment is shared by most investors and large HP shareholders," Sanford Bernstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi said Friday. "We believe the company was remiss in not conducting a comprehensive CEO search."

Scientists at UC Berkeley are peering into the mind. Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and computational models, UC Berkeley researchers have succeeded in decoding and reconstructing people’s dynamic visual experiences – in this case, watching Hollywood movie trailers. As yet, the technology can only reconstruct movie clips people have already viewed. However, the breakthrough paves the way for reproducing the movies inside our heads that no one else sees, such as dreams and memories, according to researchers.

Andrew is excited about a driver-based FPS limiter being included in a future nVIDIA driver. From a quick read through that thread it seems to be needed by people playing older games which freak out if your modern uber-card can render the game at crazy-high FPS. So if that's been bothering you, stay tuned.

Former astronauts Gene Cernan and Neil Armstrong are pushing to have the Space Shuttles brought back. Without an independent way to launch astronauts into low-Earth orbit, the United States risks ceding its global leadership in space to other nations such as Russia and China, the former Apollo astronauts said. So developing that access should be a top priority for NASA and the country, with other space exploration goals and capabilities following naturally afterward. The recently retired shuttles provide one ready-made answer, according to Cernan, who commanded NASA's Apollo 17 mission in 1972 and is the last man to leave footprints on the moon.



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All original content copyright James Rolfe. All rights reserved. No reproduction allowed without written permission.