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Monday Afternoon (12 Comments) (link)
 Monday, 6-March-2017  16:50:34 (GMT +10) - by Agg

Another 74 piracy sites may be blocked in Australia, if movie studios get their way. This second case has occurred because the studios are trying to stay ahead of the pirating sites, which often change names or web addresses to avoid blocks. If granted, it means Australian courts have blocked access to 135 piracy sites.

Robot delivery is one step closer - in the USA, at least. Virginia has made robotics history. The commonwealth is the first state to pass legislation allowing delivery robots to operate on sidewalks and crosswalks across the state. The new law goes into effect on July 1 and was signed into law by the governor last Friday. The two Virginia lawmakers who sponsored the bill, Ron Villanueva and Bill DeSteph, teamed up with Starship Technologies, an Estonian-based ground delivery robotics company, to draft the legislation. Robots operating under the new law won’t be able to exceed 10 miles per hour or weigh over 50 pounds, but they will be allowed to rove autonomously.

APHNetworks are looking for the sweet spot when building a NAS. In our report today, I would like to propose the same idea for those who are looking for a high performance, high capacity network attached storage solution. My goal is to try to strike the sweet spot in delivering a massive amount of storage, while ensuring this setup is also optimal in power efficiency, features, dependability, and performance, all without totally breaking the bank. You know, a setup that will surprise and impress your friends at the same time, just like the Honda Accord.

ComputerWorld have an article about the DVD, at 20 years old. It was 20 years ago this month that consumer electronics companies Sony and Toshiba launched a new home video format called Digital Video Disc, or DVD. The format promised a four-fold increase in resolution over VHS and the permanence of music CDs, in that the video would not degrade as you played it.



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All original content copyright James Rolfe. All rights reserved. No reproduction allowed without written permission.