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Tuesday Afternoon (6 Comments) (link)
 Tuesday, 5-December-2017  13:54:14 (GMT +10) - by Agg

Text Messaging turned 25 recently, thanks IntelInside. On December 3, 1992, British software engineer Neil Papworth? sent the world's first ever text message. It was to an executive at Vodafone, saying "Merry Christmas". Swinburne University's Belinda Barnet, who specialises in the history of technology, says no one expected how popular text messages would become.

The F1 season has come to an end, which also means the first F1 Esports World Champion has been crowned. Lewis Hamilton was celebrating another World Championship win, but at the same time, fellow Brit, 18 year old Brendon Leigh had just become World Champion in the virtual world. For fans of F1, it's time to start taking notice of the esports equivalent. Leigh won the championship thanks to a thrilling overtake on the final lap of the race.

Meanwhile, the Overclocking World Championship Final 2017 has been confirmed for Berlin, Germany, a few days from now. As you may well be aware, the contest will take place at Caseking HQ in Berlin, Germany on December 9th and 10th and is the climax of a year-long campaign to discover this year’s Overclocking World Champion. Today we are confirming the hardware that will be used in the contest, plus the overall structure and rules in place.

Here's an interesting cautionary tale about losing your PIN, and your bitcoin with a hardware wallet. The problem was, I was the thief, trying to steal my own bitcoins back from my Trezor. I felt queasy. After my sixth incorrect PIN attempt, creeping dread had escalated to heart-pounding panic—I might have kissed my 7.4 bitcoins goodbye.

NASA have successfully fired Voyager 1's thrusters, for the first time in 37 years. The unmanned spaceship was launched along with its twin, Voyager 2, more than 40 years ago to explore the outer planets of our solar system, traveling further than any human-made object in history. But after decades of operation, the "attitude control thrusters" that turn the spacecraft by firing tiny "puffs" had degraded. The small adjustments are needed to turn Voyager's antenna toward Earth, allowing it to continue sending communications.



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All original content copyright James Rolfe. All rights reserved. No reproduction allowed without written permission.